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Primary, Secondary Geography
What is a drought? Droughts are not very easy to define. A drought is not just a lack of water for a period of
Secondary Geography
Air masses are parcels of air that bring distinctive weather features to the country. An air mass is a body or ‘mass’ of air
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
The water cycle, also known as the hydrological cycle, is the process by which water travels from the Earth’s surface to the atmosphere and
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
As air blows from high to low pressure in the atmosphere, the Coriolis force diverts the air so that it follows the pressure contours.
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
Flooding Flooding is caused by: a large amount of persistent rain rapid thawing of snow a storm surge a combination of high tides and
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
Carbon (chemical element C) is one of the most abundant elements in the universe.
Secondary Geography
More links and images will be added to this page as they are identified. A comparison between 1976 and 2018 from the BBC. This fairly lengthy
Secondary Geography
The Great Smog of 1952 A fog so thick and polluted it left thousands dead wreaked havoc on London in 1952. The smoke-like pollution
Secondary Geography
Severe Winters The list below may look like something that would happen in the Arctic, but all of them happened in the UK during
Secondary Geography
New York City is no stranger to the effects of tropical storms and hurricanes. In fact, being located on something of a meteorological crossroads,
Secondary Geography
At least 1,500 people were killed and around $300 billion worth of damage was caused when Hurricane Katrina hit the south-eastern part of the
Secondary Geography
A Met Office forecaster was working on secondment in Bermuda during hurricane Igor. Some thoughts were gathered from somebody who experienced it in person.
Secondary Geography
The Great Storm of 1987 A powerful storm ravaged many parts of the UK in the middle of October 1987.  With winds gusting at
Secondary Geography
Floods can be devastating — costing the lives of people and animals, as well as destroying crops, homes and businesses.
Secondary Geography
Residents had little time to react. Cars were swept out to sea, buildings were badly damaged and people had to act quickly to survive.
Secondary Geography
A snowy day in Winter 2005 Heavy snow stops traffic on main route through Cornwall. Traffic moving on snowy road. Traffic Jam on A30
Secondary Geography
Case Studies of extreme weather
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