Fieldwork

Making weather observations and using weather and climate data in schools


How big is a raindrop? Collect data and analyse mode, mean and median, range, interquartile range and standard deviation
Topics: Observations and Data
A microclimate is the distinctive climate of a small-scale area, such as a garden, park, valley or part of a city
Topics: Observations and Data
Introduction Project ideas: 1. How accurate are weather forecasts for my local area?2. A survey of how the temperature changes in my back garden3.
We have made a cloud wheel that can be cut out and used to identify clouds. Simply download the pdf, cut out the two
Topics: Observations and Data
Here are some ideas for simple, fun weather related fieldwork which you can try out in the school grounds. We started off with 10,
Topics: Fieldwork in Geography
How to measure wind speed and direction using bubbles Equipment Bubble blowing kit Stopwatch or phone Compass or compass app Bubble Chase to Measure
Topics: Observations and Data
For Independent Investigations / A Level Non-Examined Assessment (NEA). Kestrels are available for loan.
Topics: Fieldwork in Geography
Resources to help with identifying clouds and the processes which cause them.
Topics: Observations and Data
An urban heat island is a metropolitan area which is significantly warmer than its surrounding rural areas.
Topics: Observations and Data
The rainbow is a familiar sight when the sun is shining and rain is falling. It can also be seen in the spray from
Topics: Observations and Data
High wispy clouds Related Demonstrations and Experiments Cirrus Uncinus Have you ever noticed clouds like those in the upper part of the picture on
Topics: Observations and Data
Fog
What is the difference between fog and mist and other fog questions. Fog is literally a cloud on the ground. It can cover vast
Topics: Observations and Data
The picture shows a view south over Poolewe, north-west Scotland. It was taken at 14:00 UTC on 10 June 1963 and shows something unusual:
Topics: Observations and Data
Typical Summer Clouds Related Demonstrations and Experiments  Clouds like those in the picture to the right are very commonly observed. They are called ‘cumulus’
Topics: Observations and Data
What are contrails and where do they come from? Contrails are trails of ice crystals left in the wakes of jet aircraft. These condensation
Topics: Observations and Data
WOW
The Met Office’s Weather Observations Website (WOW) is a rich source of weather data for locations in the UK and worldwide.  Here  are some
Topics: Observations and Data
Can you predict when it is going to rain where you are?
Topics: Weather Clubs
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