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Secondary Geography
Climate Change Updates Evidence from the 2013 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Report: for Geography Teachers Factsheets: 1. Signs of a Changing Climate2. Past Changes
Secondary Geography
A series of downloadable lesson plans and teacher’s notes prepared on extreme weather for A level geography. Produced by Rob Pugh Work scheme on
Secondary Geography
Units used when talking about climate change.
Secondary Geography
Questions to consider: Explain two reasons why a warming climate results in a more intense water cycle.How do changes in the water cycle impact
Secondary Geography
Questions to consider: Name one positive and one negative feedback to climate change from the ocean’s biological pump.What is the difference between the fast
Secondary Geography
Questions to consider: Describe how one country has responded to the threat of sea level rise.Explain why coastal communities are particularly vulnerable to climate
Secondary Geography
Questions to consider: Discuss the view that climate change mitigation always requires full international cooperation.Should all countries have the same goals in their climate
Secondary Geography
Questions to consider: What is meant by water security?How does climate change lead to an increase in water insecurity?Using a case study, explain one
Secondary Geography
Question to consider: Outline the significance of permafrost in the carbon cycle. Explain what is meant by a positive feedback mechanism, using the example
Secondary Geography
Climate Change Updates This resource was commended by the Scottish Association of Geography Teachers, 2016. Evidence from the 2013 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
Some Figures and Tables from the IPCC 2013 Fifth Assessment Report WG1 – The Physical Science Basis Copyright for all figures: IPCC, 2013: Climate Change
Secondary Geography
Climate is average weather and its variability over a period of time, ranging from months to millions of years.
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