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Secondary Science
By the end of the lesson: All students will know that we have seasons because the Earth is tilted
Secondary Science
By the end of the lesson: All students will know that day and night are caused by the Earth’s rotation not by the sun
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
Frequently Asked Questions from the IPCC 2013 Fifth Assessment Report
Secondary Science
A series of 4 downloadable lessons with associated PowerPoint presentations on climate change for GCSE science. Produced by Daniel Rose Download Teachers’ Notes  Teaching
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
In this section you will find a step-by-step guide to climate change. The information is written by climate experts using known facts and the
Primary, Secondary Geography
Flooding may result from a large amount of rain or from rapid thawing of snow and in coastal regions may also be caused by
Primary, Secondary Geography
What is a drought? Droughts are not very easy to define. A drought is not just a lack of water for a period of
Secondary Geography
Air masses are parcels of air that bring distinctive weather features to the country. An air mass is a body or ‘mass’ of air
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
The water cycle, also known as the hydrological cycle, is the process by which water travels from the Earth’s surface to the atmosphere and
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
As air blows from high to low pressure in the atmosphere, the Coriolis force diverts the air so that it follows the pressure contours.
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
Flooding Flooding is caused by: a large amount of persistent rain rapid thawing of snow a storm surge a combination of high tides and
Secondary Geography, Secondary Science
Carbon (chemical element C) is one of the most abundant elements in the universe.
Secondary Geography
More links and images will be added to this page as they are identified. A comparison between 1976 and 2018 from the BBC. This fairly lengthy
Secondary Geography
The Great Smog of 1952 A fog so thick and polluted it left thousands dead wreaked havoc on London in 1952. The smoke-like pollution
Secondary Geography
Severe Winters The list below may look like something that would happen in the Arctic, but all of them happened in the UK during
Secondary Geography
New York City is no stranger to the effects of tropical storms and hurricanes. In fact, being located on something of a meteorological crossroads,
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