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Weather People (early primary)

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weather people illustration
Fig 1: Weather people.
Weather person on computer
Fig 2: Man using keyboard.

Weather forecasters use observations from all over the world to work out what weather to expect next.

Weather observers are the people whose jobs it is to read the rain gauges and thermometers.

Weather forecasters use computers to help them work out what all the information means and then make a forecast.

Weather presenters tell us about the weather on TV and radio.

weather woman working on computer
Fig 3: Lady using keyboard.
weather man talking
Fig 4: Weather presenter.

Ship’s Officers collect information about the weather at sea.

Farmers need to know about the weather so they can sow their seeds and harvest their crops at the right time.

Fishermen and sailors must be able to avoid bad weather as they may be out at sea for several days.

Airline pilots need to know where the winds are blowing and if there are any storms about.

The police often have to warn people if there is going to be very bad weather.

 

 

Sailor at the helm
Fig 5: Sailor at the helm..

Web page reproduced with the kind permission of the Met Office

 

Other Recommended Resources:

Some lesson ideas from the States including poetry, art and music.

Seasons resources from NGfL-Cymru

Weather symbols the Met Office

Or how about making a weather tree to record the daily weather

Start exploring

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