Maths for Planet Earth: Climate Based Questions for students and teachers

A team of students and academics at the Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment, and Department of Physics, University of Oxford, developed the Maths for Planet Earth questions. They work on climate and energy issues and are passionate about inspiring young people to join the fight against climate change.

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The world needs brainy mathematicians to help tackle climate change.

The aim of these questions is to integrate climate change into the school curriculum beyond the usual suspects of geography and environmental science.

These questions closely follow example problems from GCSE and A level past exams and were developed using existing exam questions. The maths skills tested in the question remained unchanged, but the context of the question was adapted to a climate change theme.

A Level
Chernobyl is the site of a nuclear disaster that happened in 1986. Due to the slow decay of radioactive elements, the site is still
A Level
A hurricane is heading from the Atlantic Ocean to Miami, Florida. If the centre of the hurricane goes within a 50 kilometre radius of
A Level
A small company’s carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions since 2000 can be modelled using the parametric equations [12x = t, y = 8t – 4.9t^{2}
A Level
2 weather-monitoring satellites orbit the earth. One is in a circular orbit C₁, the other orbits in an extreme ellipse, C₂ so that it can
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