Maths for Planet Earth: Climate Based Questions for students and teachers

A team of students and academics at the Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment, and Department of Physics, University of Oxford, developed the Maths for Planet Earth questions. They work on climate and energy issues and are passionate about inspiring young people to join the fight against climate change.

Start exploring

  • Clear

environmental change institute and oxford university logo

The world needs brainy mathematicians to help tackle climate change.

The aim of these questions is to integrate climate change into the school curriculum beyond the usual suspects of geography and environmental science.

These questions closely follow example problems from GCSE and A level past exams and were developed using existing exam questions. The maths skills tested in the question remained unchanged, but the context of the question was adapted to a climate change theme.

A Level
A homeowner decides to make their house carbon-neutral. They place solar panels on the roof, which then connect o their mains circuit via a
A Level
A person decides in 2020 that they want to completely eradicate their carbon footprint in 20 months. Following this decision, they begin to use
A Level
The curve [y = e^{-0.5x} + 4x – 0.1x^{2} + 2] Can be used to describe a company’s net emissions, in tons of CO2,
A Level
A country wishes to achieve net-zero CO2 emissions in 50 years.  At the start of the program their emissions are 800MtCO2 year-1.  They decide
A Level
A manufacturer produces a tank for storing liquid CO2 underground. The tank is modelled in the shape of a hollow vertical circular cylinder closed
A Level
A country’s government wants to reduce the number of cars using internal combustion engines by encouraging the purchase of electric vehicles. The total number
A Level
You are given the equation [fleft( x right) = 5costheta – 8sintheta] a) Express f(x) in the form (Rcos{(theta + alpha})) where (R >
A Level
A scientist wishes to develop a new way of generating renewable energy. They decide to use a large magnet on a large spring, oscillating
A Level
15 cities, each of varying sizes, decide to have carbon-neutral public transport systems. When the cities are arranged in size order from smallest to
A Level
A country decides to subsidise the purchase of electric vehicles, causing more people to buy them. Initially, the country used an equivalent of 56
A Level
The warming caused by carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions over any given period is proportional to the total amount of CO₂ emitted over that period.
A Level
A small company’s carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions since 2000 can be modelled using the parametric equations [12x = t, y = 8t – 4.9t^{2}
GCSE
A homeowner wishes to cover their roof with solar panels. Their roof can be modelled as a prism with volume 24m3 The height of
GCSE
Below is a diagram of 3 offshore wind turbines, A, B and C, in a wind farm, as seen from above. Given that the
GCSE
Cars and transport, and the gases and particulates that they emit from their exhausts have a serious effect on the environment and on human
GCSE
The graph, from the IPCC 1.5 Report, shows how the rate of carbon dioxide emissions couldfall between 2020 and 2040, or between 2020 and
GCSE
A citizen wants to reduce their carbon footprint, so decides to grow their own produce in their garden. The area set out for growing
BACK TO TOP